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Line of Duty fans were left gobsmacked after the latest instalment when they found out DCI Joanne Davidson (Kelly Macdonald) is related to one of the show's other characters. Needless to say, convincing fan theories are already doing the rounds.

To help you through the seven-day slog to the next episode, we've got a gripping psychological thriller to sink your teeth into. Written by Clara Salaman and directed by former Line of Duty director Sue Tully, Too Close promises to leave viewers waiting with bated breath for each new instalment.

The must-watch drama begins tonight (12th April) at 9pm on ITV with episodes two and three airing on Tuesday and Wednesday. Featuring Chernobyl ’s Emily Watson and double Olivier Award winner Denise Gough in a compelling psychological dance, this is not one to miss.

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Forensic psychologist Dr. Emma Robertson (played by Watson) must assess a high-profile and charismatic suspect who is awaiting trial. Dubbed the “yummy mummy monster,” Connie (Gough) is charged with the attempted murders of her own daughter and the child of her best friend, Ness.

The series opens with Connie, looking distressed sitting in her car with the two girls. Cogs whir behind her eyes, she stares into nothingness and before the viewer has time to work out what’s going on, the car speeds off the edge of a bridge.

Later, Connie claims she’s suffering with amnesia and has no recollection of the incident.

It’s Emma’s job to help her remember what happened, and to discover the truth she must peel back the layers and break through Connie’s bravado. But it’s no easy task. Having lost her own daughter, the psychologist's personal life becomes fair game for her curious and perceptive patient.

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“Connie senses that Emma has a secret straight away,” says Emily. “When Emma first encounters her, she's incredibly antagonistic, aggressive and actually quite scary, but it soon becomes apparent that, in another life, these women would have been friends.

“They have a similar sensibility and just as Emma is trying to open Connie up, Connie is digging away at her too.”

Secrets are well and truly at the heart of this delicious story. “They’re like treats,” says Denise. “You don’t want to give everything away at once because then the viewer misses out on the joy of the journey.

“What I love is that, in each episode, you’re given these little treats so that by the end it’s really, really satisfying.”

It’s fair to say that the subject matter of a mother completely breaking down and attempting to kill her child is no light topic. In fact, Clara dubs the three-part series “a suburban Medea story."

She says, “This is about being a mother and how you utterly lose yourself from the moment of conception. It’s about how this ultimate act of creativity turns into the ultimate act of self destruction and culminates in a mother trying to kill the thing she’s spent her life creating.”

When asked what she feels about Connie’s character, Denise says, “I love it. I get energized by it. I find it easier on stage because you’re spat out at the end and the audience breaks the spell, but I don't find myself collapsing in my life when I play a part like this. I feel fantastic – if not slightly more fragile – but I wouldn't have it any other way.”

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Emily adds, “It's a relief actually. You can really tell whether you're getting it right or not because it either feels real or it doesn't. To me, comedy or something lighter is much scarier, because it doesn't have that certainty.”

As the two women engage in a series of intense interview scenes, the focus shifts from past to present, filling in the spaces of the story. However, the mysteries just keep on coming.

How could a bohemian ray of sunshine become so broken, so crumpled and so hostile? And what happened to Emma’s daughter? Why can’t Emma’s husband bear to say her name?

Throughout the series it’s unclear who the audience should support. But as our allegiances switch between characters, we’re left wondering what really happened? And why?

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