All English elections will be held under first-past-the-post rules after public were confused by ‘alternative vote’ method for choosing metro mayors and crime commissioners

  • The traditional method will reportedly replace the Supplementary Vote system
  • This is currently being used metro mayors and police and crime commissioners
  • The changes to the Elections Bill this week is said to be to hold them to account

The First Past The Post voting system will be used in all elections in England, reports say.

The traditional method will reportedly replace the Supplementary Vote being used for metro mayors and police and crime commissioners.

The changes to the Elections Bill this week is said to be to hold mayors and PCCs more accountable to the voters amid confusion during the ballot.

First Past The Post is the electoral system used to elect MPs to Westminster where they represent their constituency.

Voters are given a ballot paper on election day and they vote for the one MP they want to represent them in government.

The Supplementary Vote is part of a broad group of ‘preferential’ voting systems used for electing metro mayors and PCCs.

Voters have two columns of boxes next to each candidates name – one for a favourite and another for a second choice.

The traditional method will reportedly replace the Supplementary Vote being used for metro mayors and police and crime commissioners (file photo)

Hundreds of thousands of votes are thought to have been wasted using this format due to some candidates winning on the second preferences.

Sir Winston Churchill, Britain’s greatest ever prime minister, railed against this voting system.

He said in 1931 that it meant ‘the decision is to be determined by the most worthless votes given for the most worthless candidates’.

The Elections Bill will be tweaked for the elections of metro mayors, the GLA mayor, council mayors and PCCs across England and Wales from 2023.

Sir Winston Churchill, Britain’s greatest ever prime minister, railed against this voting system

Ministers hope it will bolster the accountability of those elected because voters find it easier to chose them.

A Government source told the Telegraph: ‘The person chosen to represent a local area should be the one who directly receives the most votes.’

Minister for the Constitution Chloe Smith added: ‘Britain’s long-standing national electoral system of first past the post ensures clearer accountability, and allows voters to kick out the politicians who don’t deliver.

‘First past the post is fair and simple – the person with the most votes wins.’

A referendum in 2011 found two-thirds of the public wanted to keep First Past The Post over a transferable voting system or an alternative vote system for electing MPs.

The Tory’s 2019 manifesto says: ‘We will continue to support the first past the post system of voting, as it allows voters to kick out politicians who don’t deliver, both locally and nationally.’

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