Prince Charles has said people have been "brainwashed" into thinking that humans are "nothing to do with nature" and has made it his "ambition" to battle climate change.

The Duke of Cornwall made the controversial statement in a rare interview given to BBC Radio 4 on December 29.

Speaking to host Margaret Atwood about battling climate change, Charles said he spent his time in 2020 speaking to world leaders about the issue.

He pointed to Canada’s indigenous people, known as First Nations, who he said have “wisdom and understanding of what is sacred.”

Prince Charles said Brits should think more "about the seventh unborn generation" and the fact we are a "part of nature."

The Queen’s son claimed humans appear to have been "brainwashed" into thinking people have "nothing to do with nature, and that nature can be exploited."

Branding pollution as "insanity," Prince Charles said: "Mother Nature, is our sustainer – we are part of nature, we are nature, we are a microcosm of the macrocosm.

"But we've forgotten that, or somehow been brainwashed into thinking we have nothing to do with nature, and nature can just be exploited.

"If we go on exploiting the way we are, whatever we do to nature, however much we pollute, we do to ourselves.

"It is insanity. So my great ambition is how to rewrite the balance."

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He added: "I've always felt that the First Nations people all around the world are the people who really understand these issues.

"They have a wisdom and understanding of what is sacred – the fact that in Canada the First Nations people have always believed that you have to think about the seventh unborn generation.

"I've been talking to quite a lot of the First Nations leaders in over the last year Canada and it's high time we paid more attention to their wisdom, and the wisdom of indigenous communities and First Nations people all around the world.

"We can learn so much from them as to how we can rewrite the balance, and start to rediscover a sense of the sacred."

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