EXCLUSIVE: Luxury Cornish hotel hosting G7 summit in two weeks ‘looks like a building site’ as it rushes to finish meeting complex before world leaders arrive

  • Carbis Bay hotel in Cornwall which is hosting G7 summit ‘looks like building site’ 
  • Overflowing skips, bags of cement and giant containers strewn around the hotel 
  • Teams of builders in race to clear up and to complete the three meeting rooms

The Cornish hotel hosting the G7 summit still ‘looks like a building site’ with just days to go before it welcomes world leaders, MailOnline can reveal.

With under two weeks until the prestigious event is due to start, overflowing skips, bags of cement, stacks of timber and giant containers of rumble are all still clearly visible strewn around the Carbis Bay Hotel in Cornwall.

World leaders will converge on the sleepy Cornish village on June 11 for the two-day summit. But on the approach to the hotel – where US President Joe Biden and Boris Johnson will be staying – a beachfront car park is littered with construction materials.

And parts of the main car park at the five-star hotel further down also resemble a builder’s yard with construction materials and rubbish scattered around.

The Carbis Bay Hotel in Cornwall still ‘looks like a building site’ with just weeks before it hosts the G7 summit

The hotel – where US President Joe Biden and Boris Johnson will be staying – is littered with construction materials

Overflowing skips, bags of cement, stacks of timber and giant containers of rumble are still visible around the Cornwall hotel

Teams of builders are now in a race against time to clear up as well as to complete three meeting rooms that sit above the £4,000 night lodges being used as accommodation for the summit.

One local told MailOnline: ‘It’s a real mess and they’re clearly in a race against time. Currently it looks more like a building site than a top international venue. 

‘The workers are rushing round like it’s like watching the last five minutes of an episode of Home Front.’

A builder working on the meeting rooms at the resort near St Ives told MailOnline he and his colleagues will be forced to work round the clock to make sure they are completed in time for the G7 summit opening.

One recent guest at the hotel – where rooms cost up to £1,500 and one of the beachfront lodges £4,000, wrote a scathing review on the consumer site Trip Advisor.

The guest, who stayed at the hotel earlier this month, said: ‘We were really looking forward to our holiday at this hotel as I thought that as we were staying there two to three weeks before the G7 summit, the place would be looking absolutely fabulous and in tip top condition.

‘Well, I could not have been more wrong! The hotel is a building site with diggers, lorries and bulldozers coming and going in the carpark and we felt a bit of an inconvenience as paying guests for getting in the way!’

World leaders are set to make their way to the Cornish village on June 11 for the two-day summit. Pictured: Construction materials outside the hotel

The beachfront car park is still littered with construction materials just weeks before the hotel hosts the G7 summit

Teams of builders are now in a race against time to clear up the litter around the hotel before world leaders arrive

Much of the construction work is being carried out on three meeting rooms that sit on a cliff above the luxury beach lodges

Another wrote: ‘The hotel is currently a building site and neither the swimming pool nor the spa were open.’

Much of the construction work is being carried out on three meeting rooms that sit on a cliff above the luxury beach lodges where the world leaders will stay – themselves the subject of a planning row.

As well as the Carbis Bay the nearby Treganna Castle Resort and other locations in St Ives and around Cornwall will be used for the duration of the meetings.

Thousands of police and private security firms are being drafted in to throw a ring of steel around Carbis Bay and nearby St Ives ahead of the arrival of prime ministers and presidents from the world’s leading democracies.

Members of the public walk pass the G7 Summit sign placed outside the G7 media centre at the National Maritime Museum in Cornwall

Automatic police surveillance equipment is installed outside the G7 media centre at the National Maritime Museum as the area gears up for the summit

A sign tells members of the public that temporary fencing is in place ahead of the G7 summit

A temporary communications tower is put up  outside the G7 media centre at the National Maritime Museum in Cornwall

A person walks past two main public car parks which are closed off by temporary fencing as the location becomes part of the secure area adjacent to the National Maritime Museum in  Cornwall

Police have warned people walking on foot will be subject to ID checks and parts of the South West Coast Path – which runs above the Carbis Bay Hotel – will be closed.

Residents who live close to the hotel will have to show two pieces of identification to pass security barriers.

Holidaymakers who have booked for trips to St Ives have been warned to bring identification to reach hotels and B&Bs in the town.

Extinction Rebellion is planning a series of mass protests on beaches, headlands and streets during G7.

A spokesman for Carbis Bay Hotel did not want to comment. 

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