Moment inmates ‘smoke cannabis and drink shots of vodka and rum’ at PARTY in ‘Britain’s cushiest prison’

  • Convicted criminals ‘partied with booze and drugs at Britain’s cushiest prison’ 
  • Video shows inmates at HMP Five Wells ‘smoking and downing slammers’
  • G4S, which runs the prison, said ‘appropriate action’ had been taken  
  • Five Wells in Northamptonshire is the UK’s first eco-friendly ‘super prison’

Convicted criminals appeared to party with booze and drugs in video footage at ‘Britain’s cushiest prison’. 

The clip shows inmates ‘smoking and downing slammers’, as well as enjoying party food – including snacks from a trendy air fryer – at HMP Five Wells in Wellingborough, Northamptonshire.

One caption appears to boast of them having Ciroc and Grey Goose vodkas, and Wray & Nephew Rum. The prisoners then appear to lick salt from their hands and bite a lemon wedge before downing their shots, before dancing to music and appearing to smoke cannabis.

G4S, which runs Five Wells, told MailOnline action has been taken after furious sources blasted: ‘The lunatics are running the asylum’ – adding: ‘They were partying it up for hours and so brazen about it. Clearly they were not worried about guards coming in to spoil their fun.’

The clip appears to show inmates downing shots at a party at HMP Five Wells 

Costing £253million to build, HMP Five Wells (pictured in aerial photograph) is the UK’s first privately run mega prison in Wellingborough, Northamptonshire

G4S said all cells of the prisoners involved in the videos have been searched and the ‘appropriate action taken’, with prisoners involved put on report and set to be drug tested.

A spokesperson told MailOnline: ‘Our dedicated staff work tirelessly to detect, intercept and confiscate contraband. Anyone found with a mobile phone, drugs or alcohol in prison is breaking the law and may face extra time behind bars.’

Five Wells, a Category C all-male lock-up, is the UK’s first privately run mega prison, and has a clear focus on rehabilitating offenders.

But with bright and airy rooms offering gorgeous lakeside views, free use of football pitches and beautiful landscaped gardens, you would be forgiven for thinking this was a modern university residency halls.

The prisoners appear to lick salt from their hands and bite a lemon wedge before downing their shots, before dancing to music and appearing to smoke cannabis

The prison offers light and airy rooms (pictured) that wouldn’t look out of place in a university halls brochure 

Built from recycled materials and using solar panels to reduce its carbon footprint, the lock-up will have a clear focus on rehabilitating offenders (Pictured: Multi-use games area)

The jail is seen as a flagship example of the Government’s aim to create a ‘modern, efficient prison estate’ (Pictured: Bright and spacious room for inmate)

HMP Wellingborough was closed to save tax payer £10m a year before being rebuilt as new super prison HMP Five Wells  

HMP Wellingborough was opened as a Borstal in 1963 before being converted into a Category C Training Prison for men in 1990. 

An inspection in 2003 said it was failing to meet the criteria for its role as a training prison – with only half of inmates working or in education, with the other half locked up for extended periods of time. 

In July 2012, Justice Secretary at the time Kenneth Clarke announced the prison would be closed by the end of the year in a move saving taxpayers £10million per year. 

In 2018, it was confirmed the prison site would house a new Category C prison, and HMP Five Wells began construction a year later.   

Costing £253million to build, it is seen as a flagship example of the Government’s aim to create a ‘modern, efficient prison estate’.

Its buildings are in the shape of crosses and hold up to 1,680 inmates, who sleep in brightly decorated and spacious rooms – complete with bar-less sliding windows offering unobstructed views over the beautiful River Nene and a fishing lake.

The landscaped grounds at Five Wells include a horticultural area and four multi-use games areas, two of which have raised bleachers for spectators.

The jail designers have ditched the usual K-shaped formation of prison housing blocks and instead used seven staggered cross-shaped buildings.

The K-block style has been favoured since Victorian times, with the idea that a single prison officer could be placed in the centre of the radial arms of corridors and survey all the cells quickly.

The new cross-shaped buildings mean the corridors are broken up into smaller zones, rather than miles of long corridors, which enable prison staff to have more direct contact with prisoners. The buildings have been arranged around beautifully landscaped courtyards and there is also a central hub for education, vocational training and social facilities.

The jail, which features electric car charging points, is Britain’s first eco-friendly prison and has been built using recycled materials while incorporating green energy.

It uses more efficient heating and hot water, as well as renewable energy, including solar panels.

The prison build has been handled by Kier group and has been made on the site of the former HMP Wellingborough site.

The former prison was opened as a Borstal in 1963 before being converted into a Training Prison for men in 1990. It was closed down in 2012, and held a maximum of 650 adult male inmates.

In 2018, it was confirmed the prison site would house a new Category C prison, and HMP Five Wells began construction a year later.

The name HMP Five Wells reflects the five wells in the area, which feature in Wellingborough’s coat of arms.

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