MURDER suspect Barry Morphew – who has been accused of killing his wife Suzanne – was once drafted by the Toronto Blue Jays and dreamed of playing professional baseball.

The 53-year-old was arrested earlier this month and charged with Suzanne's murder after an almost year-long hunt to locate the mother-of-two. Her body has still not been found.

  • Read our Suzanne Morphew live blog for the latest updates on the missing mother…


And while he languishes behind bars in a prison jumpsuit, life could have been very different for Barry, who was obsessed with baseball as a child and was scouted while fresh out of high school.

A source exclusively confirmed to The Sun Barry was drafted to the MLB team, while online records show he joined in 42nd round of the 1986 MLB June Amateur Draft from Alexandria-Monroe High School in Indiana.

He played in the positions of second and third baseman around 1986 and 1987, according to pro baseball sites.

A news article printed by The Alexandria Times-Tribune features a photograph of young Barry beaming for the camera, describing how he always wanted to play major league baseball.


A scout named Don Welke of the Toronto Blue Jays had met with him the year before at a tryout camp and was impressed enough to keep a record and attend his games.

"You've got to have a strong arm and speed to be considered," Barry told the newspaper.

But the article shows how he “greeted the call with a mixture of elation and anxiety” as he was torn over attending college and going pro, as he hoped to still be able to study at Michigan State.

It is not known whether he went on to study, but it appears his baseball career was short-lived and he later worked as a landscaper.


Barry met Suzanne, four years his junior, at high school, and they announced their engagement on January 5, 1994, in The Alexandria Times-Tribune.

The Morphews, who later welcomed two daughters together, Mallory and Macy, relocated from Indiana to Colorado in the spring of 2018, according to reports.

Suzanne, a former teacher, vanished on Mother's Day last year after going out on a bike ride near her home.

She has now been missing for 12 months, during which police have conducted more than 135 searches across Colorado and interviewed around 400 people.


Investigators believe she is dead but have not found her body, Chaffee County Sheriff John Spezze confirmed.

Barry previously appealed for help in finding his wife and released an emotional video to social media.

"Oh Suzanne, if anyone is out there and can hear this, that has you, please, we’ll do whatever it takes to bring you back," he said.

"We love you, we miss you, your girls need you.

"No questions asked, however much they want – I will do whatever it takes to get you back. Honey, I love you, I want you back so bad."

Barry has now been charged with murder and tampering with evidence in connection with her disappearance.

"My first reaction is relief," Melinda Moorman, Suzanne’s sister, told local Fox station KXRM.

"And grateful. I'm just so grateful."

Barry has maintained his innocence throughout the investigation and suggested she went missing due to an animal attack, an accident with someone on the road, or a run-in with another person.

Suzanne's brother, Andrew Moorman, told Dr Phil that he believed his sister was "abducted, and in this case, murdered." 

"I don't think she was taken to a second location, I think it happened at home," he said.

Andrew claimed he thought Barry was guilty "based on the behaviors and things that happened" but that he would "pray it's not." 

He launched his own independent search last September after raising funds via GoFundMe. 

Barry refused to take part saying that he believed Suzanne was no longer in the local area and hit out at her brother, claiming he was not close to his sibling before her disappearance.

He made his first court appearance in shackles last week, as his sobbing daughters mouthed: "We love you."

Barry appeared handcuffed and in an orange and white jumpsuit at Chaffee County Court in Colorado.

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