MILLIONS of Brits have played Lotto ever since its first draw in 1994.

Scooping the National Lottery jackpot would change your life forever – just think what you could spend the money on? Here's everything you need to know about the draw that takes place tonight on Saturday December 5.

What is Lotto?

National Lottery prizes are paid as a lump sum and are tax-free.

At least 28 per cent of all money spent on the games goes to "good-causes" set out by Parliament, and 50 per cent goes to the winner.

Players buy tickets with their choice of six different numbers between 1 and 59.

But for the indecisive few, random numbers can be automatically generated as part of the "Lucky Dip".

Punters can play up to seven lines of numbers on each play slip.

Players can choose to play on Wednesday or Saturday – or both – and can select the number of weeks they wish to play.

When are the Lotto draws? 

The Lotto draws take place every Wednesday and Saturday.

Tonight's Lotto draw will take place at 7.45pm on Saturday December 5.

Punters will be able to watch the draw as it is streamed live on the National Lottery website and on YouTube .

How much is the Lotto jackpot?

The Lotto jackpot for the draw on Saturday December 5 stands at £4.1million.

Tonight's draw is a rollover as the £2million jackpot up for grabs on Wednesday December 2 wasn't won.

The Lotto jackpot can only be rolled over five times.

If the top prize is not won on the fifth rollover, there's a "rolldown" which means the jackpot is shared by players matching two or more main numbers.

How does Thunderball work?

Players must pick five main numbers from 1 to 39 and on Thunderball number which ranges from 1 to 14.

Prizes may be won by matching the main numbers, but those who also match with the Thunderball will win a larger prize.

If a player matches with the Thunderball only, they could win £3, but if they have match all five numbers and the Thunderball, they could scoop £500,000.

Draws take place at 8.15pm four times a week – on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays – and are shown on the National Lottery website and YouTube.

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